Movie Talk: Blade Runner (1982)

BR-1Release Year: 1982  |  Directed By: Ridley Scott  |  Starring: Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward Hames Elmos, Daryl Hannah

I don’t suppose that there’s much more to be said about Blade Runner by this point so this review is probably redundant (and certainly thirty-seven years too late) but what the hell. I fancied watching something the other night and chose this from the DVD collection that most certainly needs trimming as part of my ongoing battle against materialism. I watched the ‘Final Cut’ version, if that’s important. It’s the only version I have ever seen so unfortunately, I’m not privy to any knowledge on the changes/additions that were made over the original theatrical release. This is turning out to be a useless review isn’t it? *ahem*

Anyway, Blade Runner is set in the ‘future’ of 2019. Looking out of my window as I type this, I can’t see the flying police cars, towering buildings or giant neon advertising signs but then again, I don’t live in LA where Blade Runner is set so who knows. This future is loaded with technology and wondrous advancement but at the same time, the film depicts nothing but urban decay and slum-like living with the populance crammed into tight streets. Further, The Tyrell Corporation has developed bioengineered human-like beings known as Replicants to do the dirty/dangerous work of humans. The Replicants are a perfect mimicry of man and are even capable of developing human emotions over time. Explained in the movie’s intro, there is a rebellion amongst Replicants working on an off-world colony and they are thus made illegal back on Earth but a small group manage to steal a shuttle and successfully make it to Earth.

Harrison Ford plays Deckard, a special type of police officer known as a Blade Runner, whose role is to hunt down Replicants hiding in society and “retire” them.

As the plot progresses, Blade Runner explores several philosophical themes with the most obvious being the morality of playing God and creating life. There is also the question of whether it is right to create beings that are more or less human with their own personalities but then treat them as disposable appliances or slaves and kill (or “retire”) them without a second thought. It’s 2019 now and artificial intelligence/man-made “people” hasn’t quite happened yet as in the world of Blade Runner BUT we are getting there at a rapid rate and so I suppose these themes have turned out to be the most relevant since this movie released in ’82. In other words, the content of movies like Blade Runner and The Terminator aren’t necessarily just sci-fi entertainment anymore but real possibilities that throw up questions and potential concerns for the near future.

Looking at Wikipedia, there are (apparently) other themes running through Blade Runner including religion, Deckard’s morality, paranoia and even literary influences. I didn’t really pick up on most of these myself and I don’t mind because for me, Blade Runner is all about the visuals and world design.

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[image: BFI.org]
I mentioned the “urban decay” look before but Blade Runner really does paint a miserable, grim future. It’s always dark and pouring with heavy rain, tight streets are choked with people pushing past one another and seediness is around every corner. There is a police presence everywhere and corporations rule supreme with enormous advertising boards and airships with giant video screens beaming more advertising down from above. There is definitely a dystopian feeling to Blade Runner but I really like it and drank in the exhaustive detail of the sets. The Asian influence with the neon advertising boards and abundance of oriental-looking civilians wearing wide-brimmed conical straw hats doesn’t really make much sense to me but it kind of fits the futuristic vision somehow.

Blade Runner is one of the original influences of all things cyber-punk and many, many forms of entertainment – books, videogames, movies – have mimicked the dark, wet and neon look. This is where it all began however and the impressive thing is how believable the sets and special effects still look considering the age of the film. The take-off and landing of the flying “spinner” police cars for example look far better than you might expect them to for a 1982 film.

There are lots of things to like about Blade Runner but for me, the movie is all about the look and the vision of a technological future. It’s why I enjoyed it the first time round and why I still enjoy it now. The only negative in my opinion is the somewhat abrupt and open-ended conclusion that leaves the viewer to decide what happens next. I know that many appreciate these sorts of “thinking man’s” endings but I personally don’t. Other than that, Blade Runner is a sci-fi classic that deserves its status. I’m definitely interested in watching the recent sequel now too.

Movie Talk: Demolition Man (1993)

I love a good old-school action film that doesn’t pretend to be anything else other than big, loud, dumb and macho. These sorts of movies are in shorter and shorter supply these days and if you want to stay away from the arty-farty, insightful releases that the critics and award-givers love to wank themselves into a frenzy over then you mostly have to fall back on comic book adaptations or shameful cash-ins of old franchises being resurrected for the modern day. The 80’s is home to the bulk of the truly good stuff but the 90’s also had it’s share of classic action such as 1993’s Demolition Man.

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Right from the off, it’s terrible one-liners, massive explosions and bulging muscles so you can immediately throw your brain out of the window, kick back and enjoy some simple entertainment. The basic premise is this: maverick, OTT cop John Spartan (Stallone) is placed into cryogenic imprisonment following his latest battle with the deadly criminal, Simon Phoenix (Snipes) due to the death of thirty hostages that Spartan’s superiors believe were killed as a result of his reckless battle with Phoenix. Phoenix is also cryogenically frozen and manages to escape in the year 2032 during a routine parole hearing.

The future has become a utopian society however where the police force haven’t had to deal with violent criminals or non-natural deaths for over twenty years so they are woefully unprepared to deal with a psychopath like Phoenix who immediately kicks off a rampage of murders and destruction. The only way they can combat Phoenix is to (reluctantly) release John Spartan prematurely.

The plot of Demolition Man is nothing special but really, it is just a vehicle for the two stars to pick up where they left off before imprisonment and wreak havoc in the future. The film has very little lulls and is either a rollercoaster of punch-ups, shoot-outs and explosions or Stallone’s character trying to get to grips with the future, leading to several comical moments and amusing quips.

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Bizarrely – and in direct contradiction to what I’ve just said about about this being a simplistic action film – Demolition Man‘s 2032 setting actually feels a lot more relevant today and is a right-wingers worst nightmare come true. Crime has been eradicated completely in order to create a peaceful utopia but as a result, a lot has had to be sacrificed. Anything deemed “bad” has been made illegal be that salt on your meal, swearing and even physical contact. So no high-fives, no kissing and certainly no sex. Everybody looks perma-happy and perfectly fine with having absolutely nothing happening at all – ever. Is this the direction that we are heading in reality? It’s possible to see some parallels, especially here in the UK where an increasing number of things are classed as “hate crimes” (resulting in murky waters where a casual, jokey insult might be interpreted as “offensive”) and unhealthy foods are constantly being watered down or taxed in order to protect unhealthy people from themselves.

Putting all of that political/social crap aside though (there are other sites out there that have explored the parallels and the films accurate predictions in much greater depth), the star of the movie is undoubtedly Wesley Snipes in full flow as the nutty Simon Phoenix. His performance as the crazy psychopathic killer is fantastic fun to behold and there is never a dull moment when his character is on-screen. Certainly one of those times where an otherwise repulsive character becomes almost lovable and I would go as far as to say that Demolition Man is worth watching for Snipes/Phoenix alone.

Many look down on movies like Demolition Man as lesser, braindead fodder for those who can’t comprehend “thoughtful” cinema but there’s nothing wrong with simple entertainment at all. Demolition Man is just a lot of fun and sometimes that’s all you require from a movie. Oh and Sandra Bullock looking dynamite in very tight trousers for the duration is pretty nice too.